EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

I bought a World Record Super 9 at the Estes auction last weekend (photos attached). This is supposed to be the set described in the March 1927 issue of Citizen's Radio Callbook. I say supposed to be because the original builder or someone later modified the circuit. There is a General Radio #367 matching transformer between the final output tube and the headphone jack, for example. Also, the wiring of the set is messy and has errors (found two so far). 

Here is the philosophical question: Should I clean up the set and maintain it as is, doing only the necessary to make it work, OR...should I dismantle it and reassemble it matching the Citizen's Radio Callbook article? I have all the necessary items, using original items from other scrapped sets. What does everyone think?

Kent

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First I must say it is a very nice looking set. I am partial to 1920's radios of all makes and you have a nice one.
If I was pretty certain that this was the set featured in the article AND I had the original magazine to display with the radio I would not hesitate to put it back the way it was originally configured. The later amateur modifications would not be important to me except that I would keep a photographic record of the 'as found' condition.

Similar situation: my '41 Buick has a starter button on the dash. It does not belong there. A previous owner made the modification when the accelerator pedal starter linked to a switch on the carb stopped working. I put in a proper carburetor and next will rewire the switch. No regrets.

Ken - did you know Buick offered short wave version Delco car radio in 1941. Friend of parents acquired one for installation in his 1942 fast back sedan. I have seen it, but that was many years ago.  Info is in Riders.

David, I did know about that. They are very rare. I have the standard Sonomatic AM only. There were two kinds of owner manuals.Almost all of them had what looked like a handwritten message on the inside cover saying "Suggest you read jack instructions on page 60." The rare one says "Suggest you read short wave radio information page 97" and For use of jack see page 59". I have both versions of the manual .. as close as I will get to the short wave. Short wave was very big then since people wanted to keep up with the war in Europe.



David C. Poland said:

Ken - did you know Buick offered short wave version Delco car radio in 1941. Friend of parents acquired one for installation in his 1942 fast back sedan. I have seen it, but that was many years ago.  Info is in Riders.

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