EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

Hello,

Looking for antenna suggestions for Scott Philharmonic.  I do a lot of troubleshooting and repair in my garage. Seeking the thoughts of fellow forum members.

My garage is probably 12 feet high, 25 feet wide and maybe 30 feet long. I have room at the ceiling to run a loop around the roof line inside the garage as much as required. 

Thanks in advance!

John

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I run the loop as you state. 

Grundig (model AN200) and others sell a smaller loop antenna. About a foot in diameter and height.

Mine has a tuning cap on one leg, to bring the loop into resonance with the station tuned. Mine came with a 1/8th mini plug socket and a mini plug with 4 ft coax cable. The cut end is intended to connect to the radio antenna and ground terminals. For a Philharmonic and others with 2 antenna terminals, strap the ground and nearest antenna terminal together with the outer coax shield wire - and the cable inner wire to the other antenna post.

Plus being naturally directional, turn the loop for maximum signal, which tends to null out any other station on the same frequency. I have two of these loops.

*

I have similar 1/8th mini cables attached to several radios so I can easily move the loop to which ever radio I am playing. (bought 10 foot mini plug mono cables, and cut them in half.)  My go to Columbus radio station  is mostly classic folk, soft rock and big band station across town -  which being lower power usually came in with annoying background noise. With the loop, comes in strong and clean. Evenings, I can pull in distance 50,000 KW stations quite well, such as WSM  Nashville at 650, KMOX at 1020.KC  St. Louis, ...   and often Zoomer Radio, Toronto at 740 KC with some nights big band, or old radio programs.

No lightening concerns using this loop. Seldom use my outdoors long wire antenna now.

*

Scott offered a variety of proprietary antennas culminating in a series of  double dipole antennas with twin lead-in from about 1935  to the late 1940's. 

A loop for am is a great idea, but for shortwave you cant beat a long wire, if you have a problem with local radio noise you could try an x-phase qrm eliminator, you can get one for a few bucks from ebay, they work really well.

This is the folding loop I made, thanks to Norman B for the photo's when I was building,

it's based on the Aalco folding loop from the 1920's

it is 2 feet on square, has a 470pf cap across 12 turns and 1 turn pickup for the radio, covers the whole band in one go.

David, 

Thank you for the suggestions

David C. Poland said:

Grundig (model AN200) and others sell a smaller loop antenna. About a foot in diameter and height.

Mine has a tuning cap on one leg, to bring the loop into resonance with the station tuned. Mine came with a 1/8th mini plug socket and a mini plug with 4 ft coax cable. The cut end is intended to connect to the radio antenna and ground terminals. For a Philharmonic and others with 2 antenna terminals, strap the ground and nearest antenna terminal together with the outer coax shield wire - and the cable inner wire to the other antenna post.

Plus being naturally directional, turn the loop for maximum signal, which tends to null out any other station on the same frequency. I have two of these loops.

*

I have similar 1/8th mini cables attached to several radios so I can easily move the loop to which ever radio I am playing. (bought 10 foot mini plug mono cables, and cut them in half.)  My go to Columbus radio station  is mostly classic folk, soft rock and big band station across town -  which being lower power usually came in with annoying background noise. With the loop, comes in strong and clean. Evenings, I can pull in distance 50,000 KW stations quite well, such as WSM  Nashville at 650, KMOX at 1020.KC  St. Louis, ...   and often Zoomer Radio, Toronto at 740 KC with some nights big band, or old radio programs.

No lightening concerns using this loop. Seldom use my outdoors long wire antenna now.

*

Scott offered a variety of proprietary antennas culminating in a series of  double dipole antennas with twin lead-in from about 1935  to the late 1940's. 

Mike,

Thank you for the suggestion.

mike hadley said:

A loop for am is a great idea, but for shortwave you cant beat a long wire, if you have a problem with local radio noise you could try an x-phase qrm eliminator, you can get one for a few bucks from ebay, they work really well.

This is the folding loop I made, thanks to Norman B for the photo's when I was building,

it's based on the Aalco folding loop from the 1920's

it is 2 feet on square, has a 470pf cap across 12 turns and 1 turn pickup for the radio, covers the whole band in one go.

Scott, thank you for the reply

Scott Seickel said:

I run the loop as you state. 

A long wire is great on SW. I had a long wire in the house, ran the length of the attic, about 30 ft. Got lots of SW with it. A few years ago, I moved my collection out to a dedicated building, inside a metal pole building. The modern Grundig or TecTenna loop as Dave described works great for AM, but my SW is limited. I need a long wire, but hate the maintenance and lightning risks of an exposed outdoor lead. Antennas can be challenging.

John: I have a 50 foot long wire on the roof of the house.  It is laid out in a V pattern with the point of the V facing East.  The Ends are on corners of the roof dormer with a coax dropped into the house.  Coax connects to the antenna input and ground on my Allwave 23. I do disconnect the antenna wire during storms. Easier to do than replacing an 80 year old antenna coil..

Thom 

Mike: What type of wire did you use to make this? Looks like a very professional build.  

mike hadley said:

A loop for am is a great idea, but for shortwave you cant beat a long wire, if you have a problem with local radio noise you could try an x-phase qrm eliminator, you can get one for a few bucks from ebay, they work really well.

This is the folding loop I made, thanks to Norman B for the photo's when I was building,

it's based on the Aalco folding loop from the 1920's

it is 2 feet on square, has a 470pf cap across 12 turns and 1 turn pickup for the radio, covers the whole band in one go.

Believe it or not it's good old black pvc wire, 0.5mm conductor 16 strand,

the coil measures 210uh and it has excellent performance, I was really surprised when I first tried the loop with a cheap radio, local stations can overload the front end, my allwave fifteen works really well with the loop when connected to the single pickup turn, allows me to null out two powerful local stations near me, and to dx on am.

I wish I made one years ago,

Mike

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