EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

Hi,
I have decided to go the route of building a cabinet for my All-Wave 23. Although it may be one of the more common cabinets I believe that the Waverley Grande is located just within the outermost boundary of my woodworking ability, and I find the “Swedish Moderne” styling and cabinet proportions very pleasing. I plan on including a Garrard RC88 changer within the cabinet as that is a unit that I am familiar with and should not be too difficult to procure. I am currently in the planning stages for the cabinet.
I have a “rough idea” of the dimensions of this cabinet, but was wondering if any member owning a Waverly-Grande might be able to supply some actual dimensions for the cabinet? I believe that I only need 5 or 6 dimensions to be able to start laying pencil to paper (however, the general rule of - the best laid plans of mice and men – may take precedence  ).
The will be an adaptation but I would like to keep it as close to the original as possible.
Thanks very much,
Fran

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As for the secondary wood, Gum was the most used furniture wood in the early part of last century.  It was used in quantities 3 to 4 times that of the primary woods like mahogany or walnut.  "Red gum" was what the heartwood was called.  It has a darker color than the outer sapwood.  I don't know why, but gum certainly has fallen out of favor.  I remember splitting it for firewood when I was young, and it was a sob to split.  Certainly are plenty of gum trees still around.  

Gum is a very small pored wood, like pine or poplar.  The other woods pointed to above have a more open grain and you will have to fill the pores. If you are going to use an open grained wood, you could just use walnut.  Poplar would possibly  be ok, but it is too light of a color to just spray toner over it.  You would end up obscuring all the grain.  You would need to use an aniline dye to darken the wood first.  Maybe do some test pieces first.  The advantage of red gum is that it is a smooth, closed grain wood that is already dark so it is easy to bring the color to where it needs to be to match the walnut.  Plus gum can have a decent figure that mimics the walnut.  Red gum is available in veneer, but it may take some searching and some $$ to find it in board thicknesses. 

Scott, That is great, I thank you and I will message you my email address.

Fran

Scott Seickel said:

Ok, dimension #3 above is 7". 

The cabinet depth is 17-1/2" total depth.

The "thingy" as you call it in front of the speaker is 3-3/4" wide and 20-5/16" tall.  The slots on it are 3/8" thick. 

Depth to record player shelf, from main cabinet top (not lid top) is 5". 

The moulding going into the recess in front shows looking square to the cabinet 1-1/4".

I took pictures with a ruler laying across the cabinet in each direction.  PM me with your private email address if you would like them.  Each pic is nearly 2mb. 

Hi Scott,
I will probably end up using walnut for the trim, but I am still pondering other ideas. Yes, I was afraid that the trim was probably red gum and was aware that it would be hard to locate. I understand that during it's hey day (1880 - 1940) there was indiscriminate logging of the old growth trees some going back 500 years or so. By the 1940s, they were mostly cut and gum trees that were left were more sap wood than heart and just not worth harvesting for millwork. I do have other choices so we will see!

Thanks,

Fran

 
Scott Seickel said:

As for the secondary wood, Gum was the most used furniture wood in the early part of last century.  It was used in quantities 3 to 4 times that of the primary woods like mahogany or walnut.  "Red gum" was what the heartwood was called.  It has a darker color than the outer sapwood.  I don't know why, but gum certainly has fallen out of favor.  I remember splitting it for firewood when I was young, and it was a sob to split.  Certainly are plenty of gum trees still around.  

Gum is a very small pored wood, like pine or poplar.  The other woods pointed to above have a more open grain and you will have to fill the pores. If you are going to use an open grained wood, you could just use walnut.  Poplar would possibly  be ok, but it is too light of a color to just spray toner over it.  You would end up obscuring all the grain.  You would need to use an aniline dye to darken the wood first.  Maybe do some test pieces first.  The advantage of red gum is that it is a smooth, closed grain wood that is already dark so it is easy to bring the color to where it needs to be to match the walnut.  Plus gum can have a decent figure that mimics the walnut.  Red gum is available in veneer, but it may take some searching and some $$ to find it in board thicknesses. 

Probably will not need the preamp, unless it has tone controls which you may want for additional bass response.

An I-phone gives decent input volume on my late AW-23 - grandchild tested.

Dave,

Thanks for the info. I will wait and make the decision about the pre amp once the phono and AW 23 are mated. It is good to know that the I phone volume is "grandchild tested".

Fran

Fran, 

I have worked with gum more than I care to say, and I steer away from it , unless a customer request it.

Gum is a very "hard" hardwood and it will dull your tools very quick.  Scott's idea about the veneer is good,. as I believe gum would be best used for turning on the lathe.  Much easier to sharpen lathe tools than table saw,planer blades and router bits.  If it were me I would use Poplar for the trim. It really depends what veneer you choose for the field , then match it with that,... Another good wood to work with is Soft Maple.

 One bit of advice, on the Poplar,.. Now,. I spray everything, I very seldom use wiping stain, so on Poplar I sand it  thoroughly,.. all the way to 220 grit and then seal it,..then I begin my  color.  Poplar has intermittent inconsistencies that will go light and dark on you. especially , if you choose wiping stains.

 Just wanted to tell you to be careful there, because there is no turning back , once an area is too dark.

Poplar is wonderful to work with, sands very easy, and I think you would enjoy working with it. 

 Good luck on your project, most of all, have fun doing it!

 Kenneth

Fran Mayer said:

Dave,

Thanks for the info. I will wait and make the decision about the pre amp once the phono and AW 23 are mated. It is good to know that the I phone volume is "grandchild tested".

Fran

Hi Kenneth,

I have decided to use Walnut for the solid trim pieces. I have worked with poplar (I taught Woodshop in High School about 1,000 years ago) but had never had the opportunity to work with gum wood. I agree completely with your comments on poplar - especially the staining inconsistencies when working with whipping stains. I plan to spray the finishes.

The solid wood and veneers have been procured as has the grille cloth (thank you Mr. Richmond for your timely introduction of the very beautiful Aztec cloth!). All I need is the time to cut, assemble and finish! Shouldn't take more than a couple of hours...:-)

Fran

Hello,

Progress on the Waverley Grande cabinet is coming along. I have attached some photos as of 10/31/18.

At this point a question has come up. How was power for the record changer supplied? Were both the changer and receiver hard wired into the switch? Or was the power switch connected to some sort of a receptacle and both the receiver and changer "plugged in"?

If anyone has a photo that might show the configuration I would be most beholding.

Thanks,

Fran

Attachments:

WOW!!! That is fabulous work!!

I'm contemplating modification to a damaged credenza I have, to create a home for my AM/FM Philharmonic. 

Fran,

I have a Garrard RC80 three speed changer in nice condition that needs a home. The RC80 preceded the RC88. I'll make it a gift to you if you want it. I'll drop it off at Chuck's house the next time you're down here. I had it in my AM-FM Philharmonic Georgian and a couple of years ago replaced it with a Garrard RC60 78 only changer.

Tom Jardine

Hi Tom,

I am very grateful for your offer however I was able to find a Garrard RC88 that I have cleaned, lubricated and adjusted. I received the new cabinet last week and am in the process of doing all of the fiddly little things to make it all fit in. I will post pics of the completed case as soon as I have it all assembled. I am very pleased with the cabinet. Here is a pic of the Garrard installed in the cabinet

Tom Jardine said:

Fran,

I have a Garrard RC80 three speed changer in nice condition that needs a home. The RC80 preceded the RC88. I'll make it a gift to you if you want it. I'll drop it off at Chuck's house the next time you're down here. I had it in my AM-FM Philharmonic Georgian and a couple of years ago replaced it with a Garrard RC60 78 only changer.

Tom Jardine

Fran,

You've done an amazing job with your Scott! And the RC88 looks just great and looks to be in super condition. I see the GE magnetic cartridge is in place. Is the radio functioning at this point? Will be interested in your appraisal when your finished! Take a look at my Scott AM-FM Philharmonic pictures on my page here. I slightly modified my RC60 changer to accommodate a GE single stylus cartridge playing through a Fisher tube preamp. It sounds wonderful.

Best regards,

Tom

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