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1937 Scott Philharmonic Waverly Grand help wanted

The radio Gods have smiled on me and I have obtained a fairly complete 1937 30 tube Scott Philharmonic Waverly Grand.  The top lifts up and a Garrard changer has been swapped in supported on a piece of plywood.   I don't think the knobs are correct.  They look like bakelite Silvertone knobs to me.

I THINK the set originally had two tweeters but no longer there and round wood covers screwed to the cabinet where they would have gone?

Cabinet is pretty nice  (a BIG plus).  Chrome is decent and will polish decently, I hope.  Looks like most tubes have been replaced with metal tubes.  At least all but one of the tube shields are still there.

Chassis has been "worked on" underneath but have no idea what has been done or if done correctly at this point.  

I'm hoping power transformer, speaker field coil, chokes and transformers are OK but it will be a while befoe I can check things out.

I would appreciate any thoughts or suggestions about this set and an idea of the value.

thanks,

Mark in the great radio wasteland of central AZ where the radio  Gods have smiled today.

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Why do you think the knobs are not correct? They look original...

If you could make a close-up picture we'd see better.

Leonid

Leonid,

Someone told me the knobs looked like Silvertone knobs.  I'm attaching a closeup photo of the knobs.  I've looked online at photos and they pretty much look correct to me.  what do you think?    I've also been told now that the tweeters were optional and it doesn't look like this set ever had them.

Mark

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When cleaning the chassis. DO NOT use Brasso or other abrasive polishes. You can not polish chrome. Any attempt will only scratch the chrome and rust will follow. I have found the best way to clean a chrome chassis is to remove the shields and then tilt the chassis and spray with windex while brushing the dust and dirt free with a small soft brush. Rinse the dirt off with windex and then dry with an old tee shirt. Compressed air helps to get it out of the gaps. Make sure all has dried before applying power.

A heat gun should be used to warm up the chassis and wiring. Take a look at my photos on this site. I have restored many Scotts and other sets and have seen no negative issues from this technique. Also if you have rust and the chrome is filmy and dull you can brush naval jelly on the rust and brush it around until the rust is gone. Then wash with windex.

There will be bare steel left and it should be wiped with oil or it will rust again.

I have many junk chassis ruined by someone smearing brasso on them. The stuff dries out and corrodes the metals around screws and sockets. Bad stuff..

Most phillys I have seen had ether wooden S knobs or Bakelite a dark maroon color. The 2 closest to the dial are usually fluted or with short handles. All others are round.

Good Luck Jeff 

Jeff,

Thanks for the good advice.  take a look at the closeup photo I put up of my knobs and let me know what you think.

I believe they may be original as they look correct based on some photos I have seen but would like verification.

Thanks,

Mark

All original except for the one with the delta shaped pointer. The round ones with dots are not that hard to fine on ebay from time to time. The levered knobs are closest to the dial on the top row.

Jeff

Mark Kaplan said:

Jeff,

Thanks for the good advice.  take a look at the closeup photo I put up of my knobs and let me know what you think.

I believe they may be original as they look correct based on some photos I have seen but would like verification.

Thanks,

Mark

One other note: don't wet transformers with anything. Wipe covers with a damp cloth. Make sure all sockets are completely dried out with heat. Jeff

Thanks Jeff,   Will do.

Mark



Jeffrey Kyle said:

One other note: don't wet transformers with anything. Wipe covers with a damp cloth. Make sure all sockets are completely dried out with heat. Jeff

Can anyone tell me what the phonograph under the lid of this set should have been?    The Garrard turntable installed with a piece of plywood is probably early 1950s.   See photo.  thanks.   Mark

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Mark,

I'd say all but one are original. The one with triangle on top is not. Should not be a big deal to find one on Ebay.

You found yourself a great radio!

Leonid

Mark Kaplan said:

Leonid,

Someone told me the knobs looked like Silvertone knobs.  I'm attaching a closeup photo of the knobs.  I've looked online at photos and they pretty much look correct to me.  what do you think?    I've also been told now that the tweeters were optional and it doesn't look like this set ever had them.

Mark

A couple versions of Garrard automatic record changers were available with that cabinet.  Likely candidates were the RC-30 and RC-50.  Both are very hard to find today and getting them working is a challenge given the prolific use of pot metal for the frame and other parts.  A satisfactory replacement that will look similar to the earlier models and may drop in without changes to the phono shelf is the Garrard RC-80.

Norman

I believe the turntable in this set is a Garrard RC80.  It sits on a home made quarter inch plywood shelf that fits the square record shelf under the lid.  I have a friend that can make me a much better looking platform of Walnut or Mahogany when the time comes.   The RC80 plugged into a one tube amp? (with a 6SC7 tube and e-cap).  The amp or maybe preamp is a better term, has four wires that are wired under the chassis.  The little metal amp box was screwed into the cabinet under the chassis shelf at the rear of the chassis. 

Thanks,

Mark

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