EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

Is there room in a cabinet originally made for a Metropolitan 16A to install an 800B chassis set and have the slide out feature, or would it have to be stationary without the slide brackets? Or would it fit at all?

I saw this one on eBay and contacted the seller to get a picture straight on of the radio-tuner chassis area: Item # 272578888450

Views: 798

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

palegreenthumb;

Yes, thank you for confirmation on their market position and how they operate. The person selling the cabinet mentioned them and I called the company yesterday to get a better understanding of their operation. I plan to join their membership rolls today and get an estimate through them. Less than truckload carriers have been operating for decades now and help keep costs down.

Joe

So far I have had two bids for about half the first bid from two companies that do less than truck load shipping. This looks like the way to go. Shipping electronics items is far less expensive when not in a large cabinet. I sure hope that I can get this cabinet at a decent price and shipping somewhere near the prices from the last two bids.

Joe

I inquired about the record changer on Antique Radio forum and learned it is a Webster Chicago model 56-13 with a GE VR cartridge and is a 78rpm only unit. These changers were being supplied during the 1946-1947 time frame. The Metropolitan 16A chassis set would have included a preamp stage to provide an adequate signal to the rest of the unit.

Joe

Joe:

I am dubious about the originality of the record changer in that cabinet.  The known original record changer is a Webster Chicago Model 70 employing a crystal cartridge (photo attached).  The Metropolitan 16B was on the market before the GE variable reluctance cartridge was available.  I don't doubt that some Metropolitan 16B receivers were sold after the variable reluctance cartridge was available but the later Metropolitan 16B receivers have been found with Webster Chicago Models 256 and 356 changers (two speed and three speed respectively).  Additionally, the "in your face" presence of the GE name and trademark on the tonearm is not characteristic of Scott Radio Laboratories, especially when similar models were available without the trademark.  I believe that the particular changer was in fact made for a GE console.

Norman

Attachments:

Norman;

What you said tends to agree with someone on the Antique Radio forum who was comparing it to a post-war GE multiband radio and thought it was a GE rather than a Scott. I was also surprised to see "GE" prominently displayed on the end of the tone arm. It may easily have been removed from a GE radio and installed in this one.

Was the Webster Chicago Model 70 a later model than the 56-13? This Scott cabinet has plenty of room to permit the installation of a large number of changer brands and models.

Joe

Joe:

I believe the Webster Model 70 preceeded the 56 series.  The Model 70 is certainly harder to find, especially with the Scott tag.  However, I have to admit that I have not seen a Webster Model 70 without the Scott tag!

Norman

To Everyone;

I just won the bid for the Metropolitan 16A cabinet on eBay! Next step will be to arrange the pickup, packing and shipping. I have several bids at very reasonable prices by using uShip as mentioned above. Now I just pray that it arrives in decent shape. I will arrange for insurance just in case.

This one is a beautiful cabinet. The 800B will look fine in it. Since I already have the angled faceplate, I think it will only be a slight modification to that to get it to fit in the Metropolitan cabinet.

Joe

Norman;

Do you know if this version of the Webster Chicago changer was ever used in the 800B or Metropolitan 16A?

This one has a turn-around arrangement for the appropriate stylus and is a 3-speed changer. It is in an 800B on eBay now.

I noticed on the picture you sent of one Webster Chicago changer that there was an escutcheon plate which had the E H Scott insignia on it. Did all Scott changers have such a label?

Joe

Joe:

That changer appears to be a Webster Model 356.  Some of the last 800B sets sold were equipped with that model of changer.  The 800B offered by the fellow in Lodi is one of the last ones sold.  Note the use of less costly cabinet hardware and the fixed front faceplate.  To my knowledge only the Webster Model 70 made for the Scott Metropolitan 16A had the Scott tag.

Norman

Norman;

Thanks for that extra information. I noticed that particular unit had a high serial number, 17854. I see now that there is no side trim on the front faceplate, so that is a clue that it is stationary. So there may be some Webster chanters paired with 800B sets that have Webster changers that have no Scott tag and are just simple brown tone arms with no other indication of changer or cartridge manufacturer on them. The changer in that set has three speeds. Would it have had a Rochelle crystal cartridge or a GE VR cartridge?

Joe

That three speed changer should have the GE variable reluctance cartridge and, of course, a GE phonograph preamplifier should be in the cabinet as well.  The serial numbers in the 17000s are reassigned serial numbers likely when John Meck bought the Scott Radio Laboratories from Hal Darr et al.  A few of them still bear the original serial number below 10,000 handwritten on the rear of the dial backplate.

Norman

Norman;

Thanks for the mention of the serial number jump. That is another fact that is probably not well known outside this group. Do we have data on the GE VR preamps?

Joe

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2022   Created by Kent King.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service