EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

Hello everybody:

Continuing with the restoration of my Scott 800B, for the amplifier I checked all the bathtube capacitors and replaced them with new ones because they had important leakages. I change all the electrolitic cap.s and carbón resistors.  The amplifier is working fine now.

As soon as possible I will start with the receiver module, meanwhile I was taking a look on the Webster-Chicago 356-1 and unfortunatelly it does not come with the original variable reluctance cartridge. It was changed by a cristal one.

I was reading reviews of GE and other cartridges used on this kind of record changer in order to decide what type I can buy and install in order to back to the original Webster-Chicago 356-1.

Considering that I want to use the cartridge with my Scott 800B for LP 33  1/3 (Mono and Stereo records) and just a few 78 records, Could you recommend me a brand and model, please?

All the suggestions will be very welcome.

Thank you very much and kind regards,

José Bustos

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Jose, my 800B that still has the original Thorens 78 record changer came with a crystal cartridge and that's what I still use. This unit has the optional dynamic noise suppressor as well. I'm not sure if the later 800B's came with or could be ordered with a GE magnetic cartridge. The Thorens tracking force (unadjustable) was too great for the GE anyway. I know that 800B's could have been supplied Webster-Chicago changers as well and may have used the GE cartridge, but would then require a preamp between the cartridge and tuner chassis. Take a look at the 800B pic's in my photo section.   Tom Jardine

Tom:

I really appreciate your answer and comments. They are very useful to me. The photo is clear and that Thorens looks great!!! Can you play stereo 331/3 records also? Whay is the brand of the cartridge? Can you recommend me one?

 

All the best and kind regards,

 

José Bustos

 Jose, I cannot play 33 1/3 records on my 800B. These were built just before Columbia introduced the LP (long playing record) in 1948. I don't think any 800B came with a three speed changer. This cartridge is an Astatic L series that were very common at that time. The big problem is they haven't been made since the 1960's or so, and older ones are almost certainly unusable because the piezoelectric crystals fail after time because of humidity, etc. West-Tech services rebuild them, so most collectors use folks like that to rebuild them. http://www.west-techservices.com/p1.htm  Many 800B's are found with 3 speed changers because original owners would replace the their 78 RPM changers with Garrards, Webster-Chigago, etc. and probably installed GE magnetic cartridges as well. The GE cartridges have a much better frequency response and track at a lighter weight for the LP's. Much better all around. If you want to play stereo LP's you'll have to install a stereo cartridge because the mono GE's are only compliant in the horizontal plane, not vertical. Stereo records will most likely object to the stylus moving in a lateral way only. If you're curious, Google playing stereo records with a monaural cartridge and you'll get a better description of the issue. Also, the 800B cuts out the tweeter in all modes but FM, so you're not likely to have the full advantage of the coaxial speaker when playing records unless you defeat the tweeter cut-out arrangement. I chose to keep this 800B all original with the original changer.  Best regard, Tom


Tom:

It was a true lesson. Thank you very much again, I am many issues to decide now.

 

Kind regards,

 

José Bustos
Tom Jardine said:

 Jose, I cannot play 33 1/3 records on my 800B. These were built just before Columbia introduced the LP (long playing record) in 1948. I don't think any 800B came with a three speed changer. This cartridge is an Astatic L series that were very common at that time. The big problem is they haven't been made since the 1960's or so, and older ones are almost certainly unusable because the piezoelectric crystals fail after time because of humidity, etc. West-Tech services rebuild them, so most collectors use folks like that to rebuild them. http://www.west-techservices.com/p1.htm  Many 800B's are found with 3 speed changers because original owners would replace the their 78 RPM changers with Garrards, Webster-Chigago, etc. and probably installed GE magnetic cartridges as well. The GE cartridges have a much better frequency response and track at a lighter weight for the LP's. Much better all around. If you want to play stereo LP's you'll have to install a stereo cartridge because the mono GE's are only compliant in the horizontal plane, not vertical. Stereo records will most likely object to the stylus moving in a lateral way only. If you're curious, Google playing stereo records with a monaural cartridge and you'll get a better description of the issue. Also, the 800B cuts out the tweeter in all modes but FM, so you're not likely to have the full advantage of the coaxial speaker when playing records unless you defeat the tweeter cut-out arrangement. I chose to keep this 800B all original with the original changer.  Best regard, Tom

I believe that some 800B receivers sold very late (1950-1951) were equipped with Webster Chicago Model 356 three speed record changers.  I would have been difficult to market the 800B that late with a 78-rpm only record changer.  I have never seen an original 800B with the Webster Model 70 changer (78-rpm only and identified in Scott literature as an option).

Norman

Thanks, Norman. I didn't know 800B's were sold that late. Jose is apparently in Chile. Interesting finding a Scott in that locale. 

Tom

Norman, Tom:

 I really appreciate your comments.

Yes I am in Chile. This radio was brought to Santiago of Chile by an embassy.

It looks all original and fortunatelly was not worked by a technician before.  My the Webster-Chicago 356-1 was modified in order to adapt a crystal cartridge. I read that model used GE RPX-040 and RPX-041, then I must to decide if I buy a variable reluctance cartridge or another type. 

Perhaps I must to forget to play 331/3 stereo records if I buy those kind of cartridges, or I must to upgrade to a modern cartridge as a second option.   What do you think?   Would be neccesary to make any changes in the radio for the second option?

 

Thank you very much indeed.

 

Saludos amigos desde Chile !!!!  Regards folks from Chile !!!!

 

 

I would consider conversion of the cartridge from crystal to GE variable reluctance to be acceptable.  In fact I would be surprised if there had not been some late 800B sets sold with the GE cartridge per customer request.  Most GE variable reluctance cartridges are capable of playing 78-rpm and microgroove records and a few were even stereo (but I would not employ a stereo model).  A GE phono preamplifier would be required but there is no shortage of space to install one within the cabinet and out of sight.  The GE variable reluctance cartridge is very highly regarded for reproduction of 78-rpm records.

I would like to visit Chile some day!

Norman

Jose, we in the Northern hemisphere can't imagine what can be found in South America. My first love is collecting 78 RPM records and I do see the occasional collectable from Argentina and Brazil. This EH Scott web site is a wonderful resource for all of us. I enjoy playing records on period equipment just to hear what the original sounded like in the 30's and 40's. I was given my first Scott, an AM-FM Philharmonic from the original owners when I was 16 back in 1962. What a revelation to see and hear what was available back in 1941. That radio had a Webster Chicago changer with crystal cartridge, but I later replaced it with a Garrard RC80 three speed changer with a GE VR cartridge and preamp. I realize that's a mismatch for sure, but it sounds pretty good. I have a Capehart 400M (1941) with a rebuilt astatic B4 cartridge, but I was never totally happy with the sound.  I think the rebuilt crystal cartridges render variable results. I'd like to hear from others on that.

Tom

Jose, by the way, it's great hearing from you and others around the world. The internet provides amazing resources for collectors. The 78rpmcommunity.com is a very interesting site for "old record" collectors as well as how to play them.

Tom

Hello Norman:

Is there any risk for a 33 1/3 stereo record If I use a variable reluctance cartridge (groove damages)? Or the problem is a bad reproduction?

For sure Norman, Chile has beatiful places. I went to the south on this hollyday because is really beatiful. Lakes, volcanos, fishing, sun, forest, national parks, hot spring, snow. All in the same season.

Thank you and kind regards,

José

The GE variable reluctance cartridge also sounds good for LP albums (33-1/3 RPM) as well.  All but the earliest GE variable reluctance cartridges had two needles, one for 78-rpm records and the other for LP and 45-rpm records.  Records will not be damaged if the correct stylus is selected.  Stylus selection consisted of pushing a knob located on top of the tonearm down and rotating 180-degrees.

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