EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

Hello from Canada.

Throughout my life I’ve always heard about McMurdo Silver and E.H. Scott radios but have never encountered one at all, least of all one which I could afford.

Does anyone have any thoughts on where someone technically minded could find such a radio at a reasonable price, one which needs some fixing up but isn’t a basket case?

Thanks,
geo

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Welcome!

Where are you located in Canada? I manage the site here and live in Ohio. I'm frequently in the Detroit and Port Huron MI areas near the Canadian border. It's not too far...and I have a variety of very restorable Scott sets I will not get to in my life. You can email me at my personal email: kent3256@hotmail.com and maybe we can work something out...

Kent

For folks new to E H Scott radios:

Use this site to get acquainted with Scott radios. In particular, at the top, is a link to the SCOTT INFO ARCHIVE.

There you will find a number of folders to browse. Suggest you pursue the cabinet folder for the wide variety of color photos. Next, perhaps the Scott News - these were 4 to 16 page marketing pieces Scott published a few time times each year during the 1930's - sorted by month, then year.  Some issues delve into the features of newly introduced models, obvious from the title of the thumbnail image of the front page.

You can also perform topic searches on the above Blog and Forum as a way to learn from the experiences of others restoring these radios.

Scott Radios of the 1930's were custom built, in that each was built upon receipt of a purchase order and then shipped to the buyer in a few weeks. Being a custom set builder, with Scott chasing performance and audio quality, a given model evolved somewhat during a one or two year model run. Scott began In the mid 1920's,  designing high performance battery superset radios, and kits, but RCA prohibited manufacture of superset radios (with certain exceptions) until about 1930.  Starting 1930, Scott manufactured his radios with leading edge design, chrome plated starting 1931, rugged construction. Many were shipped world wide.

In 1931 the Scott ALLWAVE was a 12 tube set with plug in coils, which was soon revised for internal SW coils, the ALLWAVE DELUXE. He pioneered true hi-fidelity reception with the 1935 FULL RANGE HIGH FIDELITY ALLWAVE a 23 tube with optional tweeters. In 1937, came the PHILHARMONIC 30 tube  high fidelity all wave and soon Scott begins offering lower tube count, high quality alternatives to the big feature laden Philharmonic, such as the SIXTEEN, PHANTOM and SUPER 12. 

Scott built radios, not cabinets. The buyer could order from among a number of exclusive furniture quality cabinets having prices ranging from, say, $20 to well over $100. Cabinet brochures are also in the Archive,  as are Scott price lists.

In the SET FOLDERS, you can find technical info, circuit diagrams and such which you can also print.  

Useful to know, thank you! Sounds like Scott went the same route as early automobile makers where they sold you a running chassis and you had a coach builder finish it.

For me, I'm more about the interest in the development of the circuitry, seeing what techniques and what creativity they used to achieve good performance using relatively primitive technology all without any computers!

73s

geo

David C. Poland said:

For folks new to E H Scott radios:

Use this site to get acquainted with Scott radios. In particular, at the top, is a link to the SCOTT INFO ARCHIVE.

There you will find a number of folders to browse. Suggest you pursue the cabinet folder for the wide variety of color photos. Next, perhaps the Scott News - these were 4 to 16 page marketing pieces Scott published a few time times each year during the 1930's - sorted by month, then year.  Some issues delve into the features of newly introduced models, obvious from the title of the thumbnail image of the front page.

You can also perform topic searches on the above Blog and Forum as a way to learn from the experiences of others restoring these radios.

Scott Radios of the 1930's were custom built, in that each was built upon receipt of a purchase order and then shipped to the buyer in a few weeks. Being a custom set builder, with Scott chasing performance and audio quality, a given model evolved somewhat during a one or two year model run. Scott began In the mid 1920's,  designing high performance battery superset radios, and kits, but RCA prohibited manufacture of superset radios (with certain exceptions) until about 1930.  Starting 1930, Scott manufactured his radios with leading edge design, chrome plated starting 1931, rugged construction. Many were shipped world wide.

In 1931 the Scott ALLWAVE was a 12 tube set with plug in coils, which was soon revised for internal SW coils, the ALLWAVE DELUXE. He pioneered true hi-fidelity reception with the 1935 FULL RANGE HIGH FIDELITY ALLWAVE a 23 tube with optional tweeters. In 1937, came the PHILHARMONIC 30 tube  high fidelity all wave and soon Scott begins offering lower tube count, high quality alternatives to the big feature laden Philharmonic, such as the SIXTEEN, PHANTOM and SUPER 12. 

Scott built radios, not cabinets. The buyer could order from among a number of exclusive furniture quality cabinets having prices ranging from, say, $20 to well over $100. Cabinet brochures are also in the Archive,  as are Scott price lists.

In the SET FOLDERS, you can find technical info, circuit diagrams and such which you can also print.  

Welcome George!

There are a few of us Canadians on here...I'm from Alberta.

Where are you located?

Brad

I'm in Guelph, Ontario.

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