EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

As most of you know, I've been gathering and analyzing Scott serial numbers for over 20 years. I have a couple requests....first, if you haven't sent me your serial numbers, please do. Also...if any of you have a confirmed date for a set/serial number, please send me that. There is a warranty tag on ebay at the moment, these are great, since they have the date and serial number on them. A letter with a date is also good confirmation. I would greatly appreciate any info you fellows can provide. I'll post more about serial numbers here in the future.

Kent

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Scott Radio Laboratories built approximately 2000 Metropolitan 16A receivers.  Tuner number 1815 would have been produced near the beginning of December 1947.  Chassis were stored during the production run for later sale.  It is likely that the set from which this chassis was removed had been sold during 1948 or possibly 1949.

Norman

have what I believe is a metropolitan 16 A...serial number though says 1815
amp number is 11239......any info appreciated.......

thanks a lot for that ....any knowledge on the  amp.11239 ?.....and thank you so much for reply..ken

Norman S Braithwaite said:

Scott Radio Laboratories built approximately 2000 Metropolitan 16A receivers.  Tuner number 1815 would have been produced near the beginning of December 1947.  Chassis were stored during the production run for later sale.  It is likely that the set from which this chassis was removed had been sold during 1948 or possibly 1949.

Norman

Kent;

I think I have already sent you the serial numbers of the 800B units that I have. The one that is complete with both chassis is S/N 1035 and I found the test approval date of 1 APR. 1946 inside the back shroud where the commutator is located. The other unit is an 800B S/N 6132 and its test approval date is JAN 15, 1947 and only the radio tuner chassis is here.

Joe

this unit I have sure does  work and sounds very good. I am wondering if you all might know of someone who has worked on these that might be willing to make an appropriate cable or preferably  a  little box that I can use to run whatever stereo device, recorder, cd player,  etc..  that will combine the line level outputs of said stereo  device  to a mono signal ( out) as an  input for this amp. I have read the following, that a possible  a way create a mono signal from whatever stereo device ( everything is stereo)   ...may be  to cut off the ends of the 2 RCA output cables, combine the signal grounds (the outer shield), and then use a 1 kOhm (1/4 watt, 5% tolerance) resistor ( ???...too small..?? ) to each of the center
conductors. Solder and insulate the resistors so that they do not short
 prematurely, and then connect the two resistors together. Connect
the summed signal ground to the shield of the new RCA plug, and the
summed center conductor to the center pin of the RCA plug. I am. however. not sure of a correct  resister size that this old unit will like...and,  a little box with several RCA inputs to accommodate several stereo line level inputs...that can be switched back and forth  to whatever device is being used, then  providing  one line level mono output, to be connected to this amp ,would be a lot better.....any advice appreciated,,,ken



Norman S Braithwaite said:

Scott Radio Laboratories built approximately 2000 Metropolitan 16A receivers.  Tuner number 1815 would have been produced near the beginning of December 1947.  Chassis were stored during the production run for later sale.  It is likely that the set from which this chassis was removed had been sold during 1948 or possibly 1949.

Norman

Kent,

My AM/FM Philharmonic has serial number RR332 on tuner chassis. It's in a Georgian cabinet with the three speaker option with PM tweeters. Also included was the Tauscher sound board. I noticed just recently when doing a proper electronic restoration that the power amp has written inside the chassis in large black crayon LL370. I wonder if the amp was originally intended for another tuner chassis? I knew the original owner when I received the set (1963), and I don't remember any comments about having to replace the amplifier/power supply in the past. I believe you may already have the RR332 serial number from the EHSHS days.

My 800B serial number is 800/3789. Chippendale cabinet, Thorens CD-40 changer and HH Scott dynamic noise suppressor.

Tom

Yes, I do have RR-332. The amp grease pencil numbers almost never match the set. And there is reuse of the same numbers, so I've never been sure how to integrate those into what we know about the serial numbers stamped on metal plates. I'm sticking to those right now, and don't worry about your numbers being different...its normal.

Kent

Kent, I edited my prior S/N post and added:

My 800B serial number is 800/3789. Chippendale cabinet, Thorens CD-40 changer and HH Scott dynamic noise suppressor.

Tom

Angelo, this a great story and similar to mine. I was given my AM/FM Philharmonic in 1963 when in 11th grade. It's still in beautiful and working condition. We share similar interests according to your photos - Transoceanics, McIntosh audio and old cars. I've had a '54 Chrysler and '62 Cadillac Coupe de Ville.

Tom

Curtis Schweitzer said:

I have a 23 tube All Wave Imperial in a Windsor cabinet serial number L-631. Have had the radio since 1960 when I was 13 years old. I found it in a Farmer's Union Co-op gas station and traded a 5 tube table radio for it. The radio had originally belonged to the brother of the gas station manager. The brother had worked for Scott and the radio was a retirement gift. When the guy died the radio came to North Dakota and sat in the gas station closet for many years. I stopped into the station to warm up on my way to school, saw the radio and noticed it had short wave bands. I asked what they were going to do with it and they wanted a radio to play in the station; the Scott was so big they didn't know where to put it so I offered the trade and they accepted. Some pics at:

http://curtspics1.shutterfly.com/

I believe I'm the one you were replying to. I have the Scott from the Farmer's Union station. Yes, I like old cars McIntosh and Transoceanics.

Curtis,

I'm sorry and got the names messed up. Yes, your story of acquiring a Scott at an early age was similar to mine. We didn't appreciate it then, but there were plenty of opportunities for great old stuff. I remember going to a used car lot in the late fifties with my dad and seeing a very nice mid-thirties Packard rumble seat roadster for around $500.

Tom

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