EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

As most of you know, I've been gathering and analyzing Scott serial numbers for over 20 years. I have a couple requests....first, if you haven't sent me your serial numbers, please do. Also...if any of you have a confirmed date for a set/serial number, please send me that. There is a warranty tag on ebay at the moment, these are great, since they have the date and serial number on them. A letter with a date is also good confirmation. I would greatly appreciate any info you fellows can provide. I'll post more about serial numbers here in the future.

Kent

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Welcome Joe,    Your E. H. Scott radio is likely from 1937, the year the 30 tube Philharmonic was introduced, as your serial number has a single alpha prefix. By about the end of 1937, Scott serial numbers expanded to the two alpha letter prefix, like KK-237. The Philharmonic remained in production until World War 2, but with some updates such as:  revised dial with Stradivarius motif by later 1938 with a moving dial light only instead of the dial pointer, and by 1940 two additional controls. The Scott Philharmonic was very high end and after electrical restoration is a great sounding radio especially with an FM tuner or CD player into the phono input.

Scott was a custom radio builder in the 1930's - after receipt of a purchase order, then the radio was built and usually shipped in 3 to 5 weeks. There was a choice of several exclusive cabinets at various prices including your WARRINGTON cabinet, the most often seen Philharmonic cabinet. The cabinet was shipped separately to the buyer from the furniture factory. Read the bottom of your serial number tag on the receiver.

Do NOT power up your Scott until it has been serviced - including replacing the several filter caps and all the wax/paper/foil caps, some of which are hidden.  Search out Philharmonic threads in the FORUM above. Also, you have a missing a rectifier tube on the amp. The Philharmonic was very high end, high fidelity (with the optional tweeter pair), and with theater quality audio 40 watt power. Tube numbers are embossed on the tube sockets.

If you do not have the 22 page instruction manual, go to the INFO ARCHIVE at the top of the website page and open SET FOLDERS, and then open  PHILHARMONIC for manuals and tech info. 

No pre war Scott radios are considered common, what with production of maybe 2000 to 3000 most years, some of which were sold to foreign buyers. The 125 page Scott Radio Collectors Guide, 2nd edition of 2016, is available through this website. For tech info see the above INFO ARCHIVE and some in Riders volumes 14 & 15.

I use Turtle brand liquid chrome polish and use small squares of old towel as applicators.

Hi David, thank you very much for the background and references! I had hoped the set was an earlier model, so that’s great to know. I’m glad to hear the instruction and tech manuals are posted, those are my next move. I appreciate the info!

With the 1937 introduction of the massive feature laden 30 tube Philharmonic, Scott soon launched lower tube count models for those who desired a less costly radio with the same build quality and craftsmanship - for example the 16 tube Model Sixteen in mid 1937 to mid 1938, followed in mid 1938 both the 12 tube Super 12 and the 19 tube Phantom models, etc. So, a portion of the production volumes mentioned above included these models too. Beginning with 12 tube models of the early 1930's, all Scotts until World War 2 were chrome plated like yours. 

Scott cabinets from 1929 onwards were quality furniture with good acoustic design. For a curated group of color cabinet photos submitted by fellow Scott collectors, check out the Cabinet folder in the Info Archive.

Scott also put out a series of news letters called SCOTT NEWS during the 1930's. Ranging from 4 to 16 pages, Scott Labs with topics like features of new models, new cabinets designed, and high fidelity reception which Scott Labs helped pioneer. Many issues are in the Info Archive in the folder named SCOTT NEWS.

The serial number hasn't been recorded before, thanks! Scott built about 3000 Philharmonic sets total over the roughly 5 year production. I have serial numbers for about 350, so you can rest assured you have a scarce radio. I think Dave gave you pointers to most of the helpful things here on the site. Ask questions, folks are glad to help. If you aren't up to restoring the set, there are some others here who may be able to help. Good luck and you are very fortunate to have such a fine "family" radio!

Kent

Joe Y said:

I have a pointer dial Philharmonic with serial number E-760. My great grandfather - who I am named after - ordered it new from the factory. The set is all original and has never been restored (pics posted) - it sat in the same spot in the same house it was delivered to until 2008, when I inherited it and moved to my house. I've never plugged it in, knowing it surely needs to be recapped first. I have a letter from the company, addressed to my great grandfather,  that accompanied an ordered part - which is pretty neat. 

I would love to learn more about this set from an expert perspective. How common was this set, etc. I have a small collection of 20's/30's Philco and Zenith consoles and tombstones, and also restore cabinets when I find a good candidate, but know very few specifics on the Scott models.

Hope the serial number is helpful. Thanks

I just picked up what I believe is a Scott FM Phantom Deluxe in a Wellington cabinet.  Serial No. SS-310.

I haven't poked around to get more detail.  It appears to be a 19 or 20 tube model in all original condition.  The cabinet has cutouts for tweeters, but I see no evidence that tweeters were ever installed.

Attachments:

With that speaker in the cabinet, the set did NOT have tweeters. The chassis is VERY clean, it will polish up to a 9 or 10 I believe. That is the FM Phantom, a really great performer. Cabinet looks decent, all knobs and escutcheons are there...this will be a super set for restoration.

The serial number: new one, this makes the 1886th Scott serial number - I may yet live to see 2000 serial numbers in the database.

SS-426 is the only dated set in the prefix, it was built 3/6/41, so your set predates it, probably a late 1940 set - one of the earlier FM Phantoms. 

Congratulations!

Kent

KK-190 chassis and BB-106

Both these sets should be Philharmonics. Please confirm. Do you want dates? For the BB chassis, before Nov 1937, one of the first Philly's. I'd guess it is a pointer dial set. The KK chassis, early 1938 (Q1). Probably another pointer dial, please let me know specifics when you can. Thanks!

If you want serial numbers, I've got a lot coming your way in the future.  I've spent the last three days working harder than I have in a long time removing Scott radios and equipment from houses, attics, rafters, tornado shelters, and out buildings with the temperature in the high 90's in a town five hours away. 

A friend of mine and president of the Vintage Radio and Phonograph Society in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, owns an auction company.  For many years he has been selling radio collections to close out estates.  This collection ranges from gutted chassis to excellent original, unmolested radios and everything in between.  We recovered 30 plus chassis and there are others (as well as complete radios) visible but are behind areas that will require a return trip and a chain saw. 

The auction will be in March, online and hopefully live.  Each piece will have multiple pictures AND SERIAL NUMBERS as well as descriptions.  Your book will be used to help us identify what we have.  I am a Scott collector and to me, the chrome is above average possibly due to the dry climate in the Texas panhandle.

If anybody wants to be put on the email notification list, search for Sargent Auction Service Granbury Texas

 There will be radio auctions between now and March.

Larry

Thanks Larry - That sounds like it will be a great sale. If you have anything you can't identify, please shoot me a note, I'll be happy to help. And I will be very interested in all the serial numbers. Keep us posted!

Kent

Larry Lindsey said:

If you want serial numbers, I've got a lot coming your way in the future.  I've spent the last three days working harder than I have in a long time removing Scott radios and equipment from houses, attics, rafters, tornado shelters, and out buildings with the temperature in the high 90's in a town five hours away. 

A friend of mine and president of the Vintage Radio and Phonograph Society in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, owns an auction company.  For many years he has been selling radio collections to close out estates.  This collection ranges from gutted chassis to excellent original, unmolested radios and everything in between.  We recovered 30 plus chassis and there are others (as well as complete radios) visible but are behind areas that will require a return trip and a chain saw. 

The auction will be in March, online and hopefully live.  Each piece will have multiple pictures AND SERIAL NUMBERS as well as descriptions.  Your book will be used to help us identify what we have.  I am a Scott collector and to me, the chrome is above average possibly due to the dry climate in the Texas panhandle.

If anybody wants to be put on the email notification list, search for Sargent Auction Service Granbury Texas

 There will be radio auctions between now and March.

Larry

Kent, I see on FB that some lucky guy found a pointer-dial Philly for a really good price! Has he sent you the serial number yet? ;) **wink wink**

He did mention it: F-770. I'll post some pics.

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