EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

Hi all:

I have been asked to quote the chassis restoration for an EH Scott 16.  Apparently this was about a 1937 to 1939 radio, which was about the time a lot of companies were starting to use the deadly, murdering rubber wiring.  Can anyone tell me if this model had rubber wiring?  Definitely something I need to know before I can quote this job.

Any help greatly appreciated

Best regards

Mike

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The Sixteen may have used some rubber insulated wire for some grid cap connections but no rubber wire nightmare under the chassis.

Norman

Thanks Norman!!  That will be a big relief to my customer, and to me.  

The guy sent me pictures of the cabinet, and a rear view of the chassis.  The main chassis chrome and cabinet are extremely nice on this radio.  The amp chassis looks like it might have a little surface rust, but I think it might polish out fairly well.  Would you be willing to hazard a guess as to the value of this radio fully restored?

Norman S Braithwaite said:

The Sixteen may have used some rubber insulated wire for some grid cap connections but no rubber wire nightmare under the chassis.

Norman

Sorry, I forgot to mention that it is a Braemer cabinet.

Michael J Boessen said:

Thanks Norman!!  That will be a big relief to my customer, and to me.  

The guy sent me pictures of the cabinet, and a rear view of the chassis.  The main chassis chrome and cabinet are extremely nice on this radio.  The amp chassis looks like it might have a little surface rust, but I think it might polish out fairly well.  Would you be willing to hazard a guess as to the value of this radio fully restored?

Norman S Braithwaite said:

The Sixteen may have used some rubber insulated wire for some grid cap connections but no rubber wire nightmare under the chassis.

Norman

The Sixteen was Scott's economy model and is not particularly uncommon.  Nevertheless it is a very good sounding powerhouse of a radio when operating as originally intended.  The Braemer cabinet is also relatively common.  A Scott collector in need of this set would pay up to around $600.  A collector who wants a Scott radio but does not have one may pay a little more.

Norman

Thanks Norman! 

I presume that price is based on a restored, working set?  I saw a Scott Allwave 15 sold on radio attic for over $2000.  Both I and my customer were guessing this radio was worth something on the order of 12 to 15  hundred.  I appreciate the benefit of your experience.  Could save him from making a big mistake.

I retired 2 1/2 years ago, so I am fairly new to the hobby.  I think I have restored on the order of 50 sets so far, none of them E H Scott.  I have a cousin in Arizona who has one I am trying to talk him out of.  No luck so far.  If I get it, that one might be a keeper.

Thanks again for the help.  I really appreciate your time

Mike

Norman S Braithwaite said:

The Sixteen was Scott's economy model and is not particularly uncommon.  Nevertheless it is a very good sounding powerhouse of a radio when operating as originally intended.  The Braemer cabinet is also relatively common.  A Scott collector in need of this set would pay up to around $600.  A collector who wants a Scott radio but does not have one may pay a little more.

Norman

Yes, $600 would be for an excellent original example or a functional restoration.  The Scott Allwave Fifteen is a more desirable model.

Norman

The cabinet could have a huge impact on the price too. If the 15 was sitting on a Napier, the 2k price wouldn't be a huge surprise. If it was a more common cabinet of the 15 period, the buyer might be disappointed down the road. As Norman said, the Sixteen (low-end model for 1937-38, in the Braemar (a cabinet often offered "free" with purchase) isn't a super rare combination. $600 is about average - if the chrome cleans up really well, maybe a bit more. 

Also...I would appreciate getting the serial number of the set. I have a database of almost 2000 Scott serial numbers and every new one helps. I may be able to date it from the number too.

Kent

Also, restoring a Sixteen is not difficult. If you want to see what you will get into, at the top of the site there is a link to the Scott Info Archive. Look in "Set Folders" and "16-18" and you will find the owners and service data for the set.

Kent

Thanks Norman.  Based on your input my customer decided to pass on the radio.  He asked me to convey his thanks for your help and advice.

Just a side note, you referred to the radio as "common".  Before posting my question to the forum, I looked for the set in the radio attic price guide, the Stein book and the Radio Daze book and it is not listed in any of those three.  Only two are on radio Museum.  I know the guys on pawn stars are always having to tell people "just because it's rare doesn't mean it's valuable"  but it doesn't look like there are many out there based on this.  I wish shipping wasn't so high for these big consoles or I would buy it myself.  It is in wonderful shape and a very cool radio.

Thanks again for your help.

Best regards

Mike

Norman S Braithwaite said:

Yes, $600 would be for an excellent original example or a functional restoration.  The Scott Allwave Fifteen is a more desirable model.

Norman

Mike -

Based on the serial numbers, Scott built about 1400 Sixteens and I have 104 serial numbers at this time. What we call common in the Scott world is still rare in the radio world. Even the most produced Scott (the AW23) only built just over 5000 sets and over 500 known.

Kent

Wow.  I guess I didn't realize the Scott production numbers were that small.  I think it is a testament to their product that such a large percentage still survive after 80 years.  


 Kent King said:

Mike -

Based on the serial numbers, Scott built about 1400 Sixteens and I have 104 serial numbers at this time. What we call common in the Scott world is still rare in the radio world. Even the most produced Scott (the AW23) only built just over 5000 sets and over 500 known.

Kent

Mike - in the 1930's, each Scott radio was custom built upon receiving an order from a customer. No middle man. In 3 to 5 weeks it was shipped to the customer. There was a choice of cabinets at prices from $25 to well over $100. The cabinet was shipped separately, and most were exclusive to buyers of a Scott radio, most by Rockford Peerless Furniture company. 

Very high end, well engineered and ruggedly built. Many were shipped abroad. Leading edge technology. Scott was also a high fidelity pioneer. The 1935-37 Allwave High Fidelity 23 tube Scott with the optional pair of Jensen tweeters, was the first true high fidelity sound system for the home. The 16 tube Scott "economy" model Sixteen f 1937-8 was no slouch,  better front end than, say, the much revered 15 tube Zenith of 1937-38.

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