EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

I just picked up an The New Wellington (which looks like the Gothic Grande except mine does not have the doors on the front) AW23 with a place for a Record Player.  In the Scott Catalog, it says that The New Wellington can be ordered with an Automatic Record Changer.  I am wondering what the make and model this would be.   Also, what is the year this radio would have been made?

Views: 293

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Mark - If this is the one we discussed on facebook, the serial number placed it in very late Dec 1936 or maybe early Jan 37. 

Kent

Hey Kent, it was the same one I went brain dead forgot you told me the date. LOL  Should have taken the question out but had already hit the send button before I remembered.  I am getting stoked about getting this restored at least electronically for now.  Thanks again for the info. 

 

Kent King said:

Mark - If this is the one we discussed on facebook, the serial number placed it in very late Dec 1936 or maybe early Jan 37. 

Kent

Here is a picture if the cut-out of the Record player I need. Any Ideas if which Record Changer went in here?

Having trouble add pictures hope this works now.

Attachments:

Mark:

I'm pretty sure that cut-out is for a post-WWII record changer.  I can't put my finger on the model but it is definitely not for a Garrard record changer from before 1950.  Replacement of original 78-rpm only record changers with two or three speed record changers after WWII was very common.  On the plus side, you can make a new phono board for the phonograph of your choice.

Norman

Mark: I agree with Norman, appears the phono board cutout was recut for a replacement phono. All that "fresh" exposed edge but on only portions of the cutout hence some areas with original Walnut stain. 

Reference to Scott "automatic"  meant different phono's progressing through 1930's. No longer the Capehart model 10-12 by 1936. Appears sometime in 1936  Scott offered the General Industries "flinger" for a few months, but I don't see evidence on your phono board of a place for the records to land when flung off the turntable. Scott also offered the (British) Garrard changers sometime in later 1936 or early 1937 up to WW2, progressing from the RC-1A, then the RC-10 (either a stack of 10 inch or 12 inch records) or RC-30 (stack of mixed 10 and 12 inch records). Appears the standard pickup was crystal type but Scott also offered a magnetic pickup, too, for either model changer. I have an RC-30 with crystal pickup and also another with a Magnetic pickup - both have a Scott tag on the motor. Even the Scott Automatic Deluxe changer Scott offered in 1940 appears to have been a Garrard.

I suppose for you, a Garrard RC-10 or RC-30  would be a good choice as they were well regarded, if you can find one, but make sure the cast metal frame is unbroken. I do not know if Scott offered the RC-50. For availability now, consider the post war 3 speed Garrard  RC-80 or RC-88 which look a lot like the earlier models I mentioned, and which may have the rather desirable GE variable reluctance monophonic pickup. Then you have a choice of playing LP's or 45's which were first produced by late 1949.  My 1941 edition of John F Rider:  Automatic Record Changers and Recorders has extensive information on the pre-war Garrards.

Hope all this was helpful.

The New Wellington cabinet dates from 1936 but  was likely available well into 1937 as the AW-23 was offered into late 1937, for many months after Scott introduced the 30 tube Philharmonic in Spring 1937.

So it will not hurt the value of the radio having a newer Record Changer in it.  Or can I get any record changer then and make my own Board?  If so I might think about doing that.  I am not a purest but would like to try to get is close to restoring it as it left the factory as I can if I end up restoring it.  

Again thanks Norman.  Love learning about all this.  This is by far the best one of the 3 Scotts I have.  



Norman S Braithwaite said:

Mark:

I'm pretty sure that cut-out is for a post-WWII record changer.  I can't put my finger on the model but it is definitely not for a Garrard record changer from before 1950.  Replacement of original 78-rpm only record changers with two or three speed record changers after WWII was very common.  On the plus side, you can make a new phono board for the phonograph of your choice.

Norman

Wow. That is so interesting and is I great Help. I will be on the lookout for any of these then.  As I said in a post to Norm, I am not a purist but I would like to put in something that a Scott Customer could have had put in from the factory.  Thanks again this is just the info I was looking for.  

Also, Y'all are correct someone dropped the phono board cut-out. It was dropped about an inch from where it had been.   I thought someone did that so they could use it as some kind of storage space.  I did not even think it was for the room for a newer, bigger phono changer.  Make sense. 

Mark

David C. Poland said:

Mark: I agree with Norman, appears the phono board cutout was recut for a replacement phono. All that "fresh" exposed edge but on only portions of the cutout hence some areas with original Walnut stain. 

Reference to Scott "automatic"  meant different phono's progressing through 1930's. No longer the Capehart model 10-12 by 1936. Appears sometime in 1936  Scott offered the General Industries "flinger" for a few months, but I don't see evidence on your phono board of a place for the records to land when flung off the turntable. Scott also offered the (British) Garrard changers sometime in later 1936 or early 1937 up to WW2, progressing from the RC-1A, then the RC-10 (either a stack of 10 inch or 12 inch records) or RC-30 (stack of mixed 10 and 12 inch records). Appears the standard pickup was crystal type but Scott also offered a magnetic pickup, too, for either model changer. I have an RC-30 with crystal pickup and also another with a Magnetic pickup - both have a Scott tag on the motor. Even the Scott Automatic Deluxe changer Scott offered in 1940 appears to have been a Garrard.

I suppose for you, a Garrard RC-10 or RC-30  would be a good choice as they were well regarded, if you can find one, but make sure the cast metal frame is unbroken. I do not know if Scott offered the RC-50. For availability now, consider the post war 3 speed Garrard  RC-80 or RC-88 which look a lot like the earlier models I mentioned, and which may have the rather desirable GE variable reluctance monophonic pickup. Then you have a choice of playing LP's or 45's which were first produced by late 1949.  My 1941 edition of John F Rider:  Automatic Record Changers and Recorders has extensive information on the pre-war Garrards.

Hope all this was helpful.

Mark,  

The cut-out looks like it's for a late 30's Webster Chicago Model 56-65 R.  Take a look at the photos. 

Keith

Wow, I think you got something there Keith.  Sure does seem to fit.   Is it for sale?  Mark

Keith,

Look what I just found.  I think you hit the nail on the head.  Here is the cut-out pattern for that model.  It looks like a match to me.  You?   Thanks so much.

Keith

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2020   Created by Kent King.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service