EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

As most of you know, I've been gathering and analyzing Scott serial numbers for over 20 years. I have a couple requests....first, if you haven't sent me your serial numbers, please do. Also...if any of you have a confirmed date for a set/serial number, please send me that. There is a warranty tag on ebay at the moment, these are great, since they have the date and serial number on them. A letter with a date is also good confirmation. I would greatly appreciate any info you fellows can provide. I'll post more about serial numbers here in the future.

Kent

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The company can dissect your original transformer, counting the turns in each winding.  This, of course, is more expensive than is  simply building to spec.  Let all of us here khow how you made out with Heyboer.

Suggestion:  You can add up the filament current for the tubes on each filament winding, using a receiving tube manual as a reference source. 

A Scott Phantom Deluxe FM sold yesterday on eBay. The serial # was ZZ-449.

 

Curiously, it carried a tag which stated, "Licensed under U.S. Government (Navy Department) 88 patents." Do you suppose this unit was made for the Navy during WWII, while civilian production was shut down? What use would the Navy have for this receiver, when Scott was supplying a number of other receivers for the war effort?

Hi Kent:

Do the serial numbers follow any obvious pattern? From watching the posted videos of assembly, it looks like one person was pretty much responsible for assembling one radio.  Also, I have a new power transformer for the Allwave 23 on the way from a company recommended by another list member. I also have the service and owner's manual from Alan Jesperson.

Thom

 

Thom -

 

Yes, there are clear patterns to the numbers. However, we have not been able to confirm a connection between numbers and assemblers. I have manuals (service and owners) for every Scott set in PDF....just ask if you need something.

 

Kent

I read recently that the beginning letter(s) were the assembler, and the number was how many he had assembled.  I guess there is no truth to that.

 

 

Scott...we simply do not know. It may be true, it may not. There is no evidence to prove the point conclusively. If anyone has anything to confirm or disprove it, I'd love to know about it.

Hi Kent-I just unpacked an AW23 7 knob chassis and it is serial number V-468.

 

Will piece together a complete set from parts I have.

Thanks Bruce....I had that one in the list already. Always better to double check...

I recently acquired an AW 23 (5-knob version) in a Tasman cabinet without tweeters. Serial # is X318. It was apparently originally sold to Mr. T. A. Miller, 1308 E. N. Grand Ave., Springfield, IL. It came with a January 18, 1949 letter from Joseph R. Sensyk, Scott Radio Laboratories Service Manager, to Mr. Miller suggesting that he replace the 83V tube. If that failed to solve the problem, Mr. Miller should bring the receiver to the laboratories during his next visit to Chicago.

 

BTW, it came with the original boxes used to ship the two chassis and speaker...

Kent:

Interesting thread on the serial numbers. The Allwave 23 I bought in April came from Elmhurst Illnois which is a western suburb of Chicago. I didn't ask the seller where he got it from, tho I can. Is there any record or way of knowing who a radio might have been built for by serial number? 

Also, I have yet to go into the tuner chassis and should do that soon, before I try to use the radio. If they haven't been already, is there any recommendation as to what to use to  replace the bypass caps?

Thanks

Thom

Ted - Thanks...I had X318 already. Finding a set with boxes is a great find. That service letter sounds very typical, Joe Senszyk has a LOT of letters out there, I've got several myself. He was the service manager for quite a few years. Good luck with it!

Thom -

 

There are no original company records of serial numbers. The only thing I've had to work from is about 1700 known serial numbers and making associations by review.

 

When restoring the set, I always use the yellow mylar capacitors to replace the bypass caps. The 630 V units are great universal replacements. I keep a stock of all the common values. Also, if you want to restore the original caps, you can melt the cores out and the yellow mylar caps will fit inside the old casings.

 

Don't hesitate to ask questions here on the forum...

 

Ken t

 

Thomas Day said:

Kent:

Interesting thread on the serial numbers. The Allwave 23 I bought in April came from Elmhurst Illnois which is a western suburb of Chicago. I didn't ask the seller where he got it from, tho I can. Is there any record or way of knowing who a radio might have been built for by serial number? 

Also, I have yet to go into the tuner chassis and should do that soon, before I try to use the radio. If they haven't been already, is there any recommendation as to what to use to  replace the bypass caps?

Thanks

Thom

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