EH Scott Radio Enthusiasts

The Fine Things are Always Hand Made

Folks - I have had this for years. I've asked before. We have a new, pretty active group here. What do you all think this might be. Speculate: what would the tube lineup be and why? I've long suspected it might be a chassis for some variation of Quaranta, especially with the connector holes on the side. Would love to get your thoughts!

Kent

Views: 180

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Maybe the line up could be from right to left, power transformer, a pair of 5Z3's, then a couple of chokes followed by three smoothing caps, then 6 x 6L6 tubes in push pull, finally a 6sn7 phase splitter, that would be good for a 100watts of audio, but Scott used transformer couipling quite a lot.

I take it that all of the round holes are the same size?

Godd question.

Could be 2A3s too. Now let me throw in something else many folks may not have seen. This is probably not related to the amp chassis, but - it does show Scott sometimes put odd things under tube shields.

This is a device found with a Phantom - the Phantom power cable plugs into the socket on this little unit. The cable then goes to a <Philharmonic> power supply - allows you to run a Phantom on a Philly amp/speaker system. The two plugs are <not> compatible. This isn't a "one off" either - I have two of these and know of a 3rd. Note the one tube shield is hiding a significant wattage resistor, not a tube. (The other two sockets are for 6J5 tubes)

So just something to consider for an odd socket here - maybe not a tube (although since it is punched for a tube, and the Phantom "preamp" isn't, I still do think 7 tubes out there on the amp.

Kent

Attachments:

On the amp chassis, looks like the round side apron is large, as if designed for a Jones plug (like on the 1941 Laureate).

The shape of the two transformer punch outs suggests to me a later Philharmonic or Phantom power transformer.

So I am thinking 1940 or more likely a 1941 item.

The small rectangular side apron punch out is not in keeping with Scott prewar speaker sockets I have seen, but perhaps would suffice for a PM speaker socket.

Well, my 2 cents:  It is set up for FP style capacitors which came into use in the late 30's, about '39 or so to the best of my knowledge.  It was Mershon wet type before that and stud mount.  It looks like an extended Philharmonic amp chassis.  As David pointed out, the large hole would certainly be a Jones type, also indicating a later chassis. 

So my guess is that it is 1939 or later and would be a pair of 5U4's, a quad of 6L6's and then ???  Just taking a stab in the dark at what the extra holes might be for, maybe an active crossover?  Maybe power supply to field coils?

Too bad someone removed all the components. 

I don't believe the chassis was ever assembled, there are no marks on it to appear as if it was used.

Scott Seickel said:

Well, my 2 cents:  It is set up for FP style capacitors which came into use in the late 30's, about '39 or so to the best of my knowledge.  It was Mershon wet type before that and stud mount.  It looks like an extended Philharmonic amp chassis.  As David pointed out, the large hole would certainly be a Jones type, also indicating a later chassis. 

So my guess is that it is 1939 or later and would be a pair of 5U4's, a quad of 6L6's and then ???  Just taking a stab in the dark at what the extra holes might be for, maybe an active crossover?  Maybe power supply to field coils?

Too bad someone removed all the components. 

My guess is that it was a chassis designed to support record cutter operation on a Phantom receiver and employing resistance coupling rather than transformer coupling.

Norman

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2021   Created by Kent King.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service